The Best Laid Plans vs. the Best Habitat…or Why I am Putting in a ‘River’ of Siberian Iris and Golden Carex

I’ve been trying, really I have,  to stay with the plans I laid out a year or so ago.  Perennials here.  Red border there.  Groundcovers over there.  These shrubs in this place and those trees in that.

But I’m discovering, now that we’re here all the time, that some of the ideas don’t work as well as I planned. The land itself isn’t cooperating.

For example, there are some low-lying areas that have standing water for a day or so after a heavy rain and since they are in an irrigated zone, they don’t ever get very dry.  The lawns or groundcovers I planned just won’t grow there.  But you know what will?

Siberian Irises. Iris sibirica

And Golden Carex. Carex Bowles Golden..

 

So I’ve developed a plan for a ‘river’ of gold Carex ‘Bowles Variety‘  instead of lawn, with  swathes of Siberian Irises ‘Caesar’s Brother‘ down the length of it for their deep purple bloom in June.  And their grass-like leaves the rest of the summer will contrast with and complement the golden leaves of the Carex.  This ‘river’ will run across the perennial border, from the Orchard all the way into the Woodland – several hundred winding feet.  It will not only be suitable planting for a wet area, but by tying two distant areas together it will actually be an improvement to the design.  I had initially planned a stone path for that purpose — but I think this planting will do a better job.   Later, if I like, I can still put in the path, but the ‘river’ will give the path a reason for being.

Succession Planting

Like Moliere’s Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme who discovered he had been using prose all his life…I have been doing succession planting all my life.  But I only recently (a few years ago) read an article by the late Christopher Lloyd in which he named it.

What it describes is a way of having a succession of different plant ‘pictures’ in the same spot.  So as one plant either dies down for the season, or finishes flowering, another plant in the same spot comes to the fore.  Some common examples that most gardeners have seen or used are early Daffodils in the lawn, the Daffodils flowering in early spring, then disappearing as the lawn greens up; spring bulbs similarly can bring early color to the perennial border which then covers their dying leaves; early blooming sun loving plants can do well under the shade of deciduous trees – because the sun lovers get their needs fulfilled before the now-leafy trees shade the area.

Some examples I have used in past gardens (and may well use again).  Heuchera ‘Palace Purple’ interplanted with Allium aflatunense.  The rich, purple balls of the Allium flowers are lovely; but the leaves always turn brown at the tips and look weather-beaten even when they’re not.  The Heuchera not only hides the unsightly leaves;  the effect is as if the Allium flower is growing from the Heuchera leaves and the colors of the leaves and flowers complement each other wonderfully.  Then by the time the Allium flowers are over, the Heuchera’s own creamy froth of flowers take over.

Glory of the Snow (Chionodoxa) interplanted with Siberian Iris and Japanese Anemone.  The brilliant blue Chionodoxa bulbs make a better and better show as the years progress – and appear while the Irises are just beginning to come up in the early spring.  Then the Iris leaves and the Anemone leaves) take over the area and cover the yellowing Chionodoxa leaves.  The Irises begin to flower in June and after those flowers are over the area becomes( for a while ) a lovely contrast in green texture —  tall slim Iris leaves and Maple-like Anemone leaves.  Then by summer’s end the Anemones begin to flower until frost.

It takes some knowledge of various plants’ ‘schedules’, and yes, sometimes the planned succession doesn’t work out quite as well as it should.  But when it does l it is so much fun to watch an area change – almost  magically –over the weeks and months.